Sunday, February 24, 2013

Wow! Exercise make your blood sugar go low

Ok, I'm not dumb about this fact, but I just started a couch to 5k app this morning. My sister and I are going to try to do it together, even though she is 200 miles away. We figure accountability is the key, at least for me. When I walk with friends or go to the gym and meet them, I go. I hate mustering the energy to exercise alone.

Anyway, my sister couldn't believe that I started this morning. Really, she probably thought I was the last person to step up before her. She is three years younger and in much better physical shape than me. But the spirit moved me, I bought new, expensive shoes and I'm off. I also thought I might as well track what I'm eating in another app. Baby, baby steps as I make my health more of a priority.

So, on my walk-to-jog day one, I figured it would kick my butt, so I reduced my basal rate to 75 percent. After 12 minutes I had to suspend my pump and when I hit the cool down I has double arrow dropping from 80. I had to stop, missing the five minute cool down. I also skipped a couple of the jog portions when I was walking up a hill or I was just wiped out. As my fanny hit the couch I was 55. I slurped a juice and ate some fruit and cheese.

I ate breakfast and took my normal insulin before I left. I'm thinking that i might need to do a 50 percent basal reduction next time, or maybe even suspend just before I go. Any advice here?  Can't wait to use my CGM to figure out this puzzle.

5 comments:

Ryan Long said...

Wendy,

In my opinion, you absolutely must suspend your pump. At the very minimum, this should be done while you work out. Potentially, you must switch off the pump 30 minutes or more before you go.

But this changes as your body gets in better shape. If you are in good shape, theoretically your blood sugar should rise as you perform intense aerobic activity, and then plummet anywhere between 1 and 24 hours afterward.

I know you use CGM, so your best bet is to lean heavily on what CGM tells you about your workout/post-workout BG levels. You always have to carry sugar with you while you run, because exercise-induced hypoglycemia is extremely unpredictable.

I, personally, was not able to successfully run while on the insulin pump. For whatever reason, MDI therapy works better for me.

I have a PDF copy of a book about exercise and type 1 diabetes that I would be happy to share with you, if you are interested. I found it very helpful. If you'd like to read it, send me an email and I'll forward it on to you. johnlocke.jr (at) gmail (dot) com

Best of luck!

Wendy Morgan said...

Hi Ryan,

Thanks so much for your comment. I am not in good shape, so this it's exactly the advice I need. I would love to review the book you mentioned.

I could see the possibility of needing an alternate lower basal pattern on work out days. I look forward to getting this as right as possible.

Thanks,

Wendy

Wendy Morgan said...

Hi Ryan,

Thanks so much for your comment. I am not in good shape, so this it's exactly the advice I need. I would love to review the book you mentioned.

I could see the possibility of needing an alternate lower basal pattern on work out days. I look forward to getting this as right as possible.

Thanks,

Wendy

Kelly said...

Its so hard to know what to do when starting! What works for me is reducing basal an hour ahead of time and having a small 6c snack at that time, no bolus for it of course!

Scott K. Johnson said...

Echoing what others have said. When I use a temp rate for exercise, I have to start it a good 60-90 minutes ahead of time otherwise it's pretty useless.

It's lots of trial and error, and keeping some notes.

I also heard that rapid drops from exercise can usually be tracked back to some insulin being on board, where a slower drop can be from too much basal insulin.

Hope that helps! Stick with it - you can do it!